John Donnelly and Gopal Ratnam are reporters with CQ-Roll Call. Reprinted by permission from CQ Roll Call. Last fall, when the Navy was examining gaping holes in its cybersecurity, its outside consultant leading the project ordered his team to learn the ancient Chinese strategy game Go. In that board game, two players place black and white discs one by one onto a grid. The players then slowly try to encircle each other until the victor completely envelops the loser’s pieces. The point, says Michael Bayer, the veteran Pentagon adviser who ran the Navy’s review, was to show that China and other foes are encircling and exploiting America’s weak flanks rather than directly challenging its conventional military strengths. Meanwhile, he says, American policymakers tend to think in checkers or chess terms, directly attacking an opponent. The Chinese play both games, but westerners generally do not know Go. “If you play checkers or chess you want to grab the data on weapons systems,” Bayer said. “If you play Go, you want to grab the Office of Personnel Management background files on everybody,” referring to a 2014 hack orchestrated by Beijing. I...