Decorative painting at the Dietrich Theater in downtown Tunkhannock for ages 16 to adult Wednesday, Dec. 18, from noon to 3 p.m. Instructor: Teresa Brewer. Cost: $20 per class + cost of painting surface. Learn decorative painting techniques while creating decorative pieces for your home or to give as gifts. Preregister by calling 570-996-1500. Call the Dietrich at 570-996-1500 to register.

Everhart Connects: Stitching It All Together at the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock. Friday, Dec. 20, Jan. 10, 17, 24 and 31 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Instructor: Peg McDade. For ages 55+ Cost: free, materials provided. Supported by: the Everhart Museum and the Northeastern Pennsylvania Health Care Foundation, Take a trip through fibers, fabric, and stitches with nationally-known Fiber Artist Peg McDade as you explore your experiences and memories of home, locale and place. Peg will help you plan a very individual fiber artwork, demonstrate skills you may need to complete it during class time or at home, and will bring a wide variety of textiles, yarns, canvas and hand tools to class for your selection and use. All experience levels welcome. Call the Dietrich at 570-996-1500 to register.

Holiday Camp at the Dietrich Theater in downtown Tunkhannock for ages 5 to 12. Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 30 and 31 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Instructors: Amy and Steve Colley. Cost: $25 for this two-day camp. Experience the arts during your holiday break at the Dietrich! You will have the opportunity to throw pots on a potter’s wheel, create sculptures and make masks. Call the Dietrich at 570-996-1500 to register.

The Waverly Community House, 1115 North Abington Road, introduces its new Performing Arts program for children. The program is offered to children in grades 2 through 5 and no prior experience is required. The 10-week program takes place on Wednesdays from 4 to 6 p.m. beginning on Jan. 22nd and will culminate with a performance of Disney’s “Jungle Book” on Saturday, April 18. Directing the show is Matthew Grotzinger, a Scranton School District elementary music teacher and Waverly resident. Cost is $150 per student (a $15 discount is offered to children currently enrolled in the CommKids Program) and is due by January 13, 2020. Registration forms are available at waverlycomm.org or by visiting The Comm Office. Questions may be directed to vivian@waverlycomm.org.

CLARKS SUMMIT — Santa brought Christmas cheer as he was visiting children at Silver Spoons Diner. Jennifer DePaolo and her husband, who are the new owners of the eating establishment in downtown Clarks Summit, partnered with the Make-A-Wish Greater Pennsylvania and West Virginia for an event called Dining with Santa, held on Monday, Dec. 23.

Kids got to sit with Santa and have their picture taken with him. The pictures were printed at the restaurant for the children to take home.

“We love it,” said Jennifer. We have children so it’s always nice to have events like this for the children.”

Each kid was given a wrapped present from Santa’s sack. Six-year-old Hannah Coons, of Lexington Park, Maryland received a little guitar while her 3-year-old friend Stella Lance from Scranton got a Frozen-themed note pad. I was excited to see Santa,” said Stella. Hannah was excited to write a letter to Santa in the diner. Make-A-Wish receives a dollar for every letter to Santa dropped off by the children.

Celebrating her first Christmas, four-month-old Paisley Neary, of Lake Winola was held by Santa as she got her picture taken with him. “It’s awesome,” her mother Kailey Neary said about this event. “It is a great way to meet Santa and get in the holiday spirit.”

Donning his red suit and white beard, South Abington Township resident Tony Federici was dressed as Santa for the event. “I’m a parent and retired physical education teacher so I like children,” he said. “And Santa is a great job for that.”

Donations for Dining with Santa were encouraged. Proceeds will benefit the Make-A-Wish Pennsylvania and West Virginia. “The Silver Spoon Diner approached us about a partnership as a way to give back to the community,” said Maggie O’Brien, regional manager of this local branch of the foundation.

“Proceeds from their event will be used in support of a local wish. Since 1988, we’ve granted nearly 300 wishes for children from Lackawanna County. At this time we are working on 10 more wishes for children who are diagnosed with critical illnesses.”

Clare Kozlosky, 83, will get the surprise of her life when she reads about how her two grandchildren, David Teska, 18 and Molly Teska, 16 will be marching in the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Parade on New Year’s Day.

Kozlosky has been an active member of the Abington community all of her life. Born in Dalton, Kozlosky moved to Glenburn Terrace after she married. It’s where she still lives. She was involved with Our Lady of Snows Church, on the board of the Senior Center, Clarks Summit, and worked for years at the Grove Street Elementary School.

According to Kozlosky’s daughter, Susan Teska, her mother and father have always been proud of their grandchildren’s accomplishments.

“She has been reading The Abington Journal for 50-plus years, and I want this article to be a surprise,” Teska said.

Teska explained how her two children are members of The Baldwinsville Marching Band in Baldwinsville, New York, near Syracuse. The band was selected to be in this parade from around the world.

“This is huge,” said Teska. “It’s a great accomplishment for the band and the kids. There’s a band from Finland, Japan, Mexico, and only three or four from the United States. There is a total of 14 bands chosen.”

The 150-member band is mostly made up of tenth, eleventh and twelfth grade students of Baker High School in the Baldwinsville Central School District. Ten seniors that graduated last year (including Teska’s son) will also be traveling with the band.

“It’s quite a process to apply and get invited,” Teska explained. “They’ve actually been working at it for three or four years. They’ve had to send videos of the kids and make sure they were involved in the community. And there’s a big long essay that the band director fills out with input from the kids.”

Teska’s son, David, is named after his grandfather who passed away several years ago because as Teska says, “He had three girls and always wanted a boy. I was supposed to be David. So, we named our son after Poppy.”

He is also a freshman at Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York, studying engineering. He was also in The Baldwinsville Marching Band for six years in high school, and he is one of the few band members who were also in the Macy’s Day Parade in New York City five years ago. He plays saxophone.

Molly is a junior with high honors and has actually been an “orchestra girl” for the past nine years playing violin. Her brother talked her into joining the band two years ago, and now she does both. Molly plays percussion in the band.

“Me and my husband, Mark, are so very proud of them, and we know that nana will be, too,” Teska said.

The parade airs January 1 at 11 a.m. eastern standard time. The Baldwinsville Marching Band is number 33 in the line-up.

Through the “Good Works” of the Olyphant Freedom Fighters Committee, a stainless steel statue will be erected directly across from The Queen City Train Station flagpole in downtown Olyphant. It will portray a Gulf War solider, saluting all who served in the conflict. Donations and grants are covering the cost of the $60,000 project. From left, are Mark Zinskie, statute artist; Commissioner Patrick M. O’Malley, Kim and George Atkinson, committee; and Commissioner Laureen A. Cummings.

Revello’s Pizza of Old Forge was the small business spotlighted at the Nov. 6 Lackawanna County Commissioners meeting. The restaurant has been in business for 53 years in the famed “pizza district.” It recently opened satellite locations on the first floor of The Mall At Steamtown near center court, PNC Field, Mohegan Sun, Kingston and Drums, serving a number of its traditional favorites. From left, are aommissioner Patrick M. O’Malley, Pat Revello, owner; and Commissioner Laureen A. Cummings.

RANSOM TWP. — At the Dec. 9 supervisors meeting, Alliance Landfill Community Relations Coordinator John Hambrose announced a construction crew will install vertical and horizontal gas wells on top of the property near Snake Road to prevent odors from new waste. He said Alliance Landfill doesn’t normally begin installation until springtime, but he recalls last spring being wet, generating odors caused by extra gas, adding that Alliance decided to break the gas wells construction into two phases — early winter and summer.

“We’re getting in there now,” Hambrose said. “It’s not the best time of year construction-wise to do this work but it helps us get in front of the gas generation.”

Hambrose mentioned Alliance Landfill is also waiting for state approval for a new disposal cell, which will also be on the top part of the property. He said the company will build a cell on the bottom part, as well, reporting the construction project will take two years.

“We are looking at continued volumes of 2,000 tons a year, which is what we’ve seen recently,” he said. “And that will continue to generate some good revenues for the township.”

Hambrose mentioned he delivered annual benefit payments that support police coverage from the South Abington Twp. Police Department and fire coverage from the Newton Ransom Volunteer Fire Company.

• In his treasury report, chairman Dennis Macheska reported the total general fund to be $848,417.50 and the total liquid fuels fund to be $123,814 plus 986,000 in CD’s ($1,109,814).

• Ransom Twp. was reimbursed $114,613.74 from FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) and $37,290.02 from PEMA (Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency) for damage caused by a storm in August 2018.

The next regular township meeting will be Monday, Jan. 6 in the township building immediately following the 6 p.m. reorganization meeting.

The University of Scranton’s 11th annual Community Christmas Day Breakfast will take place Wednesday, Dec. 25, from 8 to 10:30 a.m. in the third floor Fresh Food Company of the DeNaples Center on campus. The breakfast, organized by the Center for Service and Social Justice and Dining Services/ARAMARK, is offered free of charge to the elderly or those who are alone or in need as a gift to the community for the holiday season. The university’s dining service/ARAMARK staff and volunteers from the university will prepare and serve the breakfast that will include eggs, sausage, pancakes, danish, juice and more. Reservations are not needed to attend. Parking is available for the breakfast in the university’s parking pavilion on Mulberry Street. For additional information, call 570-941-7401.

A discussion group led by Clarks Summit native Dane Hewlett will be held at The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., Clarks Summit, on four Thursdays : Jan. 2, 16, 30 and Feb. 6. The discussion, titled “The Paradox of Elderhood,” will be centered around the need for new attitudes toward our elder population, our need for elders and what it takes to be a true elder. The group will meet from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.. To register, visit www. GatheringPlaceCS.org or call 570-881-7612. Cost is $25 and all ages are welcome to be part of the program.

Marywood University’s music, theatre, and dance department will host its Senior Wind Band Celebration 10th Anniversary performance on Saturday, Jan. 25 in the Sette LaVerghetta Center for Performing Arts on the University’s campus.

The Celebration Band will begin at 7 p.m., led by conductor Lauren Reynolds. At 7:30 p.m., Patrick Erwin will conduct the Celebration Band. The evening will conclude with the Honor Band taking the stage at 8 p.m., led by conductor Donald Schofield.

The Wind Band Celebration Festival Concerts include numerous local and regional students from the following high schools: Abington Heights, Blue Mountain, Blue Ridge , Crestwood, Dallas, Delaware Valley, Dunmore, East Stroudsburg (North and South), Eldred Central, Elk Lake, Greater Nanticoke Area, Hazleton Area, Honesdale, Lackawanna Trail, Lakeland, Mountain View, NEPA Homeschool, North Pocono, North Schuylkill, Pocono Mountain East, Pocono Mountain West, Port Jervis, Scranton, Susquehanna Community, Tunkhannock, Valley View, Wilkes-Barre Area, Wyoming Area Secondary, and Wyoming Valley West.

Holiday Camp at the Dietrich Theater in downtown Tunkhannock for ages 5 to 12. Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 30 and 31 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Instructors: Amy and Steve Colley. Cost: $25 for this two-day camp. Experience the arts during your holiday break at the Dietrich! You will have the opportunity to throw pots on a potter’s wheel, create sculptures and make masks. Call the Dietrich at 570-996-1500 to register.

Everhart Connects: Stitching It All Together at the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock. Friday, Jan. 10, 17, 24 and 31 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Instructor: Peg McDade. For ages 55+ Cost: free, materials provided. Supported by: the Everhart Museum and the Northeastern Pennsylvania Health Care Foundation, Take a trip through fibers, fabric, and stitches with nationally-known Fiber Artist Peg McDade as you explore your experiences and memories of home, locale and place. Peg will help you plan a very individual fiber artwork, demonstrate skills you may need to complete it during class time or at home, and will bring a wide variety of textiles, yarns, canvas and hand tools to class for your selection and use. All experience levels welcome. Call the Dietrich at 570-996-1500 to register.

The Waverly Community House, 1115 North Abington Road, introduces its new Performing Arts program for children. The program is offered to children in grades 2 through 5 and no prior experience is required. The 10-week program takes place on Wednesdays from 4 to 6 p.m. beginning on Jan. 22 and will culminate with a performance of Disney’s “Jungle Book” on Saturday, April 18. Directing the show is Matthew Grotzinger, a Scranton School District elementary music teacher and Waverly resident. Cost is $150 per student (a $15 discount is offered to children currently enrolled in the CommKids Program) and is due by January 13, 2020. Registration forms are available at waverlycomm.org or by visiting The Comm Office. Questions may be directed to vivian@waverlycomm.org.

Bob Lizza, Dietrich mural artist, explained the process he used to create the mural of the Tunkhannock Viaduct or Nicholson Bridge on the back wall of the Dietrich Theater and the Keystone Community Resources artists also explained how they created their paintings on canvas, paper, furniture and a door.

The recent Meet the Artists reception was attended by loved ones and those who wished to talk to the artists about the processes they used to create their art.

Lizza’s process was so well recorded with the photographs of his daughter Natalie and he had samples of the materials he used to install the mural. Cain Chamberlain, executive director of the Endless Mountains Heritage Region, and Jean Ruhf, executive director of the Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau, came to celebrate the installation of the first of three panels. We are so grateful to both organizations and to the Wyoming County Room Tax Fund and PA DCNR for funding the mural project.

Also present were all three Wyoming County Commissioners, Judy Mead, Tom Henry and Mike Stabinsky. And Steve Colley, art teacher for the Keystone Community Resources artists, was there to support the artists.

“I am blown away by the creativity of these artists. They know just what they want to create. They are a joy to work with,” Colley said.

Their artwork is for sale at the Dietrich, all proceeds to benefit the artists. They make perfect holiday gifts and you will make the artists so happy by purchasing them.

Speaking of holiday gifts, you can do one-stop shopping at the Dietrich. Everyone loves our gift bags. Our 13 Gift Bag Ladies have spent over 900 hours gift wrapping 2,000 gift bags with two movie tickets, popcorn bags to be filled at the theater and candy treats, festively done up in at least 10 different cellophane designs.

“Very popular this year,” says Shirley Fisher, who organizes the operation, “are the pink and purple bags with snowflakes on them. Perfect for little girls.” But there are designs for everyone, each lovingly wrapped by our gift bag angels. Stop by the Dietrich office during business hours or whenever movies are shown. You can buy them at the concession stand.

I know you want to know what you should know about what is coming up at the Dietrich early in 2020. For all of you Jane Austin fans, we have just the perfect event you will want to attend. On Sunday, Jan. 5 at 3 p.m., VIA (formerly WVIA) returns for the Sanditon Preview Event. In 1817, Jane Austen started writing “Sanditon,” but she never finished it. Now, it is finished and it comes to PBS Masterpiece on Jan. 12, thanks to screenwriter Andrew Davies. Make your free reservations at www.wvia.org. Free tickets will be available at the door — first come, first served.

The very next Sunday, Jan, 12 and again on Jan. 19 at 2 p.m., you are invited to view “Les Miserables,” a screened performance direct from an acclaimed two-and-a-half year return to Broadway. “Les Miserables” is the most popular musical, breaking box office records in its 33rd year. Set against the backdrop of 19th century France, it tells the story of broken dreams and unrequited love, passion, sacrifice, and redemption — a timeless testament to the survival of the human spirit. Now you can see it on the Dietrich’s big screen.

We invite you to come for your last-minute Christmas shopping or to see one of our blockbuster movies. And we also invite you to put a Dietrich event on your 2020 calendar so you won’t miss it. Remember we have planned ahead to bring you the best of entertainment in the new year. You know we do it all just for you.

SCRANTON — State Rep. Marty Flynn, D-Lackawanna, said community improvement projects in the 113th Legislative District will receive $182,500 in state funding through the Neighborhood Assistance Program.

NAP encourages private capital in projects designed to help distressed areas or low-income populations in a neighborhood by offering tax credits for the investment.

“The private partnership encouraged by the Neighborhood Assistance Program can benefit many important projects designed to help the people of Scranton, such as with affordable housing, community services, crime prevention, education, job training, charitable food, eradicating blight, veterans’ initiatives, long-term community revitalization and addressing special population issues,” Flynn said.

Flynn said the United Neighborhood Center of Scranton will use its community investments to enhance the business district on Cedar Avenue corridor by creating an incubator for small business, offering entrepreneurship and leadership skills to the immigrant community and expanding the community farmers market, as well as assisting city residents with crucial homeownership services to help prevent future mortgage delinquency and foreclosure.

Scranton Neighborhood Housing Services will use its investment to assist city residents with foreclosure-prevention services and educate homeowners and prospective homeowners about the steps they should take to avoid foreclosure and mortgage delinquency.

The Neighborhood Assistance Program is administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development

CLARKS SUMMIT — The third concert in the Arts at First Presbyterian series will take place on Sunday, Jan. 12 at 4 p.m. featuring the John M. Vaida Trio. The trio is composed of violinist John Michael Vaida, pianist Timothy Burns and cellist Theodore Buchholz, as they present a lively piece called “Cafe Music” by Paul Schoenfield, as well as piano trios by Haydn and Dvořák. The First Presbyterian Church is located at 300 School St.

A versatile musician, Vaida performs regularly as a soloist, recitalist, chamber musician, and orchestral player. He serves on the faculty at Mansfield University and Wilkes University, and as Artist-in-Residence at the Wyoming Seminary College Preparatory School. During the summers, he is on the faculty at the Killington Music Festival. An avid chamber musician, he is the executive director and co-founder of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Chamber Music Society, an organization dedicated to fostering the growth of chamber music in the Northeastern Pennsylvania region.

Buchholz is the cello professor at the University of Arizona, where he also serves as String Area Coordinator, String Chamber Music Coordinator, and the Director of the UA String Project. He has performed in prominent venues from New York’s Lincoln Center to international halls in Italy and Tokyo, and in important venues across the United States. Buchholz is the cellist of the Deco Piano Trio which holds a residency at the White Lakes Chamber Music Festival.

Burns is a versatile performer and collaborator, with significant instrumental, vocal, and choral accompanying experience. He holds degrees in piano performance, music theory pedagogy, and collaborative piano from Duquesne University and the Eastman School of Music. Currently, Dr. Burns serves as supervisor of piano accompanying at Colorado State University, where he frequently collaborates with faculty, guest artists, and students.

This concert is open to the public, free of charge, but a free-will offering is taken to help defray the cost of the event. This event is part of the Arts at First Presbyterian concert series at the church. This program receives support from the Pennsylvania Partners in the Arts Program (administered by the Pocono Arts Council), a Lackawanna County Arts & Cultural Grant, and numerous individual donors.

CLARKS SUMMIT — At the Dec. 4 borough council meeting, Kevin Hayes, in his solicitor’s report, mentioned the council has an escrow agreement with engineer Mike Noto, who is interested in purchasing land at Sheridan […]

CLARKS GREEN — Snowflakes falling on the stage from nearby trees set the Christmas mood to the musical performances while members of Servant Church of the Abingtons set the stage to share the gift of […]

FACTORYVILLE — Christy Mathewson Park was filled with street markets that resembled those in the quaint little towns of Germany during the weekend of Dec. 7 and 8 as this little town celebrated its third […]

SCRANTON — Broadway Theatre League of NEPA and NEIU19 continue to sponsor a group of performing artists to provide workshops in acting, vocal performance and dance. Students in grades 5-8 and 9-12 are improving their […]

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP. — The Griffin Pond Animal Shelter was bustling with activity and holiday cheer Saturday as pet owners lined up with their pets to have photos taken. Photographer Rich Banick graciously volunteered his […]

CLARKS SUMMIT — Christmas gift giving is upon us and last Saturday, local artists, artisans, authors and other vendors showcased their one-of-a-kind items in time for shoppers to purchase something special for those on their […]

BENTON TWP. — A ceremony on Nov. 15 celebrated the grand re-opening of Baylor’s Bridge, which had been closed since April 2015. After working on it for five seasons, the PennDOT maintenance crew has completely […]

CLARKS SUMMIT — Abington Heights High School will get all jazzed up for the upcoming fall production of “Chicago High School Edition.” Set in the early age of jazz in the titular city, this musical […]

CARBONDALE — A few miles north of Scranton, located off a side road, itself off another side road in the city of Carbondale, is a recreational facility unlike any other in our area, because it’s […]

CLARKS SUMMIT — At the Nov. 6 borough council meeting, Angelo Rudolfi, a full-time police officer with the Waverly Police Department and part-time officer with the Clarks Summit Police Department, mentioned the South Abington Police […]

SCRANTON — During a visit to Scranton on Dec. 20, U.S. Senator Bob Casey (D-PA) spent time visiting with clients of the Aging in Place program of NeighborWorks Northeastern Pennsylvania. Casey, who serves as ranking […]

TUNKHANNOCK — Despite the gloomy weather and sea of muti-colored umbrellas, children of all ages and their families enjoyed a magical Christmas train ride last weekend. Both days, the railroad ran three 80-minute round trip […]

We have heard our share of information about hackers, scammers and thieves this year. Unfortunately, the internet is more dangerous than ever during the holidays. Data breaches and attacks are happening all around us. Scams […]

Thousands of colored lights. Whimsical lighted decorations outside the theater. We invite you to make the Dietrich Theater a destination this holiday season – to see a movie, buy your Christmas gift bags or gift […]

Every December, it’s heartwarming to look back on the year and remember all the things that were special at Dalton Community Library. We think about the people who’ve helped us enjoy another wonderful year of […]

The state’s Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program is continuing to accept applications for the winter season. I am reminding residents to apply for the federally funded help. The program offers cash grants to help with […]

Just as we celebrated Veterans Day in November, Gov. Tom Wolf announced grant applications are being accepted for programs and services benefiting Pennsylvania veterans. Nonprofit organizations, veterans service organizations and county directors across Pennsylvania can […]

I am reminding college-bound students and their parents that the application process for financial assistance for higher education is now open. Pennsylvania Higher Education Aide guidebooks are available at my district office at Jay’s Commons, […]

The season of fall is certainly here. The scene outside of drifting, colorful leaves lets us know winter is near. More time is being spent inside by many people but, as the temperature cools, The […]

Not since “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” showed at the Dietrich Theater in 2002 has there been such a buzz about a movie! For the last two months, the phones at the Dietrich Theater have […]

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